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Partial Lunar Eclipse, 2021-11-19

In the early morning hours of November 19th, 2021, the fully illuminated moon passed through the Earth’s shadow. The moon did not pass entirely into the shadow reaching 97% percent coverage at max eclipse. Hence, this was a partial lunar eclipse. The fact that the moon was near apogee, the farthest distance from Earth in its elliptical orbit, meant that the moon was at its smallest as viewed from Earth. This also meant that the time it took to traverse the shadow was maximized.

At moonrise, high clouds blocked the moon, and it appeared the after midnight eclipse could be obscured. However, clouds cleared for the most part during the 12:19 – 03:47 am eclipse timeframe. I used a Paramount MYT telescope mount with a Nikon Z6 camera and Sigma 600mm lens to record the event. I also used a 1.4x teleconverter so the focal length was 840mm. I chose to only record UHD video and occasionally ventured outside in the subfreezing air to look at the spectacle with my own eyes. It was an amazing sight with Orion not far away.

Below is a timelapse video from the video recording. I also made a timelapse of my four low-light surveillance cameras to show how the light dimmed during the eclipse. The third video is the complete real-time recording which I have placed in my “Simply Being There” playlist. If you want to just watch the event as it took place, you can sit back an do so.

I am grateful that the clouds cleared out, and that I was able to see this wonderful wonderful event. Enjoy

Timelapse of the partial lunar eclipse during the early morning hours of November 19th. Recorded with a Nikon Z6 and Sigma 840mm lens riding on top of a Paramount MYT.
Timelapse from four low-light surveillance cameras at the ZT Research Observatory during the 97% partial lunar eclipse during the early morning hours of November 19th.
Real-time video of the partial lunar eclipse as seen from the ZT Research Observatory.

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“Optical Observations of Needles in Upward Lightning Flashes” published in Nature Scientific Reports

Our latest peer-reviewed journal paper “Optical Observations of Needles in Upward Lightning Flashes” was published on 15 Oct 2020. It is open access and available for download at the link below.

Paper download

The paper describes how attempted branches on positive leader channels can pulse well after the leader tip continues propagating away. These pulsing features are defined as “needles” and in rare cases, they can develop into a negative leader branch.

Figure showing a pulsing needle on a positive leader channel that develops into a negative leader branch

The online version of the paper which includes supplementary video can be found at this link.

Saba, M.M.F., A. R. de Paiva, L. C. Concollato, T. A. Warner and C. Schumann (2020), Optical observation of needles in upward lightning flashes. Sci Rep 10, 17460 (2020) doi:10.1038/s41598-020-74597-6

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